adv tips
Advice/

ETIQUETTE

 

It is etiquette to start the day being dressed correctly, read more about this under Advice - Clothing and Equipment.

Arrive on time

Do not be late for the start. This is not tolerated by some hosts, as you will not only keep the team of guns waiting, you will also keep the keepers and beaters waiting. Starting the day late at certain times of the year could very much disrupt the day.

Drawing pegs

Having drawn your peg number – remember it - as you will be expected to be standing on the correct peg at the start of the drive. Listen closely to the shoot captains or shoot managers briefing of the day, so that you are aware of the day’s expectations and which birds/species you can and cannot shoot. If in doubt - do ask. If you have drawn a peg on the end of the line, for example peg 1 or 8 (if shooting a team of 8 guns), do ask if you are allowed to move from your peg if necessary, as some shoot captains allow this and some do not.

Cartridges

Take sufficient cartridges for the day, as it is deemed to be foolish and rude to run out, and if you do run out on a drive this is not always appreciated by the game keeper. However do not overload the vehicle that you are travelling in either, as this will indicate your experience.

Gun handling and safety

Gun handling and safety is of paramount importance. Always handle the gun safely. For example, when closing the gun always do it into the ground. Once you are on your peg, look around to see where the pickers up and beaters are. When shooting pheasants and partridge, you must always have sky behind the bird. Keep in mind what the beaters and keepers see from their perspective.

Even if a bird is safe it is not etiquette to blow it to pieces at close range, nor is it etiquette to spend the day shooting at your neighbours birds.

Bringing your own dog

Should you have a dog that you wish to take to the shoot and pick up some birds with, always ask the host or shoot manager beforehand. Also if the pickers up standing behind you are a little anxious to pick up the birds, then ask them politely to leave a few for your dog. Do not become upset with them as most of them, as with the beaters, do this for fun and a day out as this is also their sport.

Mobile phone

However busy you may be at work, do not be seen to be on your mobile phone. Again this can hold the team up and will not always be tolerated.

Beaters and shoot staff

If ever possible always say hello to the beaters and shoot staff. Remember without them your day would not commence.

Tips

At the end of the day you are expected to tip your loader (if you had one) and to tip the head game keeper. The size of the bag reflects the size of the tip, so ask your host or shoot captain the expected amount.


BROCHURE!

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or request one when you visit the West London Shooting School.

Read the digital version

WLS brochure

 

advice etiquette ny
BROCHURE!

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or request one when you visit the West London Shooting School.

Read the digital version

 WLS brochure

It is etiquette to start the day being dressed correctly, read more about this under Advice - Clothing and Equipment.

Arrive on time

Do not be late for the start. This is not tolerated by some hosts, as you will not only keep the team of guns waiting, you will also keep the keepers and beaters waiting. Starting the day late at certain times of the year could very much disrupt the day.

Drawing pegs

Having drawn your peg number – remember it - as you will be expected to be standing on the correct peg at the start of the drive. Listen closely to the shoot captains or shoot managers briefing of the day, so that you are aware of the day’s expectations and which birds/species you can and cannot shoot. If in doubt - do ask. If you have drawn a peg on the end of the line, for example peg 1 or 8 (if shooting a team of 8 guns), do ask if you are allowed to move from your peg if necessary, as some shoot captains allow this and some do not.

Cartridges

Take sufficient cartridges for the day, as it is deemed to be foolish and rude to run out, and if you do run out on a drive this is not always appreciated by the game keeper. However do not overload the vehicle that you are travelling in either, as this will indicate your experience.

Gun handling and safety

Gun handling and safety is of paramount importance. Always handle the gun safely. For example, when closing the gun always do it into the ground. Once you are on your peg, look around to see where the pickers up and beaters are. When shooting pheasants and partridge, you must always have sky behind the bird. Keep in mind what the beaters and keepers see from their perspective.

Even if a bird is safe it is not etiquette to blow it to pieces at close range, nor is it etiquette to spend the day shooting at your neighbours birds.

Bringing your own dog

Should you have a dog that you wish to take to the shoot and pick up some birds with, always ask the host or shoot manager beforehand. Also if the pickers up standing behind you are a little anxious to pick up the birds, then ask them politely to leave a few for your dog. Do not become upset with them as most of them, as with the beaters, do this for fun and a day out as this is also their sport.

Mobile phone

However busy you may be at work, do not be seen to be on your mobile phone. Again this can hold the team up and will not always be tolerated.

Beaters and shoot staff

If ever possible always say hello to the beaters and shoot staff. Remember without them your day would not commence.

Tips

At the end of the day you are expected to tip your loader (if you had one) and to tip the head game keeper. The size of the bag reflects the size of the tip, so ask your host or shoot captain the expected amount.